Guides, Travel Comoros, Uncategorized

How To Relocate A Sea Turtle Nest

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Mother nature knows best, and in her infinite wisdom a balance of life and death has been created on our planet. Unfortunately due to human kind breaking out of it’s mold and conquering just about every corner of our earth, whether its physical presence in the harshest desert landscapes, drilling for oil deep beneath the ocean or separating ourselves from nature with impressive buildings and creations. Our success has come at a steep price for many species on this earth, and we are currently living through the Holocene mass extinction. The next mass extinction since Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event, where no tetrapods larger than 25 kg except the leatherback turtle and crocodile survived.

The IUCN (International Union Conservation of Nature) monitors the population levels, health, distribution and projection of animals and decides to award them one of the 7 labels. Ranging from least concern to extinct. Sea turtles, who are sleek and elegant however have been hunted for their flesh and eggs by several cultures worldwide, are all on the endangered species list. There are 7 species of turtle, and none of them have escaped the effects of human expansion. That is why, whenever we see a injured, trapped or struggling turtle, it is our responsibility to help.

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Green Sea Turtle Status

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conservation, Travel Comoros

Saving Baby Turtle Hatchlings

After conducting a discover scuba dive from Laka Lodge, I offered my students whether or not they would like to have a walk on the beach. Completely unknown to me, this small decision would lead me to one of the best days of my life. Today, I would like to share with you how I helped 19 tiny turtles, to make their way across their first obstacle in life and enter the oceans.

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The Village of Itsamia

In the Comoros, there are two commonly seen types of sea turtles : The Green Sea Turtle and the Hawksbill sea turtle. These two are not only prevelant in the oceans, but the beaches here have become some of their most common nesting sites. Itsamia is the second largest nesting site for Green Turtles in the Indian Ocean. They lay their eggs year round and the 600 occupant village has been a driver in their protection in the last 40 years. Long before the first Marine Park was established in Moheli (in the year 2001), Itsamia inhabitants protected the turtles from being hunted and eaten.

Long before this was an environmental choice, they simply could not stand the stench of turtle and egg carcasses left behind by the hoard of hunters coming from other islands and villages. Since then environmental factors such as gaining a better understanding of the importance of healthy ecosystems, (since primarily all the villages on Moheli depend on fishing) and the benefits of tourism as renewed their vigour for protecting the nesting sites. All year round it is possible to go visit Itsamia and both see an adult female testing, and hundreds of tiny hatchlings emerging from the sand.

Green Turtles

Green turtles are one of the largest sea turtles and the only herbivore out of the 7 different species of sea turtle. The name has been given to them due to the green colouring of the cartilage, rather than the common beleif of being named after their shell. They reside mainly in tropical and subtropical waters world wide.

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